Archive for the 'Community' Category

OpenNMS-based App Wins Digital Jersey Hackathon

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

I was delighted to find out that an Android app using OpenNMS as the backend won the “Best App” prize at the first ever Jersey Hackathon.

Note: This is Jersey as in the island and not Jersey as in New.

The Open Alert “Man on Site” app is a small Android application that is designed to track the activities of people working alone at a remote site. From the wiki:

When activated this reports the location of the phone on a regular basis back to a central OpenNMS server. OpenNMS is configured to plot the current location and status of the device on a geographical map (Open Streetmap).

The App has four buttons;

Start Job – This is pressed by the worker when they start lone working on site. This starts a timer in the local App and on OpenNMS. The local timer will generate an alarm on the local device if the user forgets to report in after a set time.

Report In – This must be pressed when prompted by the local timer. If it is pressed both the timer in OpenNMS and the local device will be reset. If it isn’t pressed then OpenNMS will escalate the ‘Man on site’ event to the next level of severity and notify the OpenNMS operator that there is a problem. (Obviously the local timer should be set to 5-10 minutes less than the OpenNMS time out.) OpenNMS will keep escalating the alarm until it is signalled as critical. If the alarm is escalated, then there should be manual processes in place to contact the worker by other means or send someone else to site to make sure they are OK.

Finish Job – This should be pressed when the worker leaves site. The man on site alarm is cleared in OpenNMS and no further escalation takes place.

Panic – If the panic button is pressed, an immediate critical alarm is created in OpenNMS indicating that the worker on site is in trouble and needs help.

OpenNMS maintains a log of all of the movements of the user and also of the time of starting work / stopping work / panic events which could be important for triage if an incident happens.

Congratulations to the authors, Craig Gallen and Mark Wharton, who created this during the 48 hours of the Hackathon. We built OpenNMS to be a platform and not just an application and this is one example of what can be created leveraging it.

More information can be found on the UK OpenNMS Site and the code is available on Github.

Anarchy OpenNMS in the UK

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

OpenNMS has a strong presence in both Europe and the UK, and much of the UK effort is driven by Dr. Craig Gallen.

He has created a new website and newsletter aimed at OpenNMS users in the United Kingdom and Ireland (but, of course, it is open to anyone).

The new website can be found at opennms.co.uk and I think it is pretty spiffy (“spiffy” is a proper English word, correct?). There is also an occasional newletter list focusing on OpenNMS events in the region, so if you are interested in such things please register.

The first big push to raise awareness of OpenNMS as well as provide training is a series of OpenNMS workshops to be held around the area. In Craigs words:

Don’t just expect to be lectured to. This will be a participative event. These workshops will stretch your understanding of Operational Support systems and help you to begin thinking through how you can adapt OpenNMS to address some of the key problems in Network and Service Management.

London – Monday 30 June 2014

Location: University of London Union, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HY

Birmingham – Tuesday 1 July 2014

Location: IET Aston Court, 80 Cambridge Street, Birmingham, B1 2NP

Rochdale (near Manchester) – Wednesday 2 July 2014

Location: Zen Interent Ltd. Sandbrook Park, Sandbrook Way, Rochdale, OL11 1RY

Glasgow – Friday 4 July 2014

Location: IET Glasgow: Teacher Building, 14 St Enoch Square, Glasgow, G1 4DB

There is a cost associated with the workshops, but there are a number of discounts available. There is an early bird discount of 10% if you book before 13 June, and if you are a current commercial support customer or a non-profit there is a further reduction in cost. Also, sending more than one person creates even more discounts.

So if you are a non-profit, buy a commercial support contract and then book a whole bunch of people before 13 June and you’ll be saving money hand over fist (grin).

Visit the Registration Page for more details.

This is a wondeful way to get up to speed on OpenNMS and I appreciate the effort Craig put into making these workshops available.

OpenNMS Users Conference Call for Papers

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

In case you missed it, the Call for Papers for next year’s OpenNMS Users Conference is now open.

In my ten plus years of working on OpenNMS, I think the thing I am most proud of is the formation of the non-profit OpenNMS Foundation Europe e.V.. This was organized totally by people not on the payroll of The OpenNMS Group and their inaugural conference in Fulda, Germany, last year was a lot of fun.

Their sophomore effort will take place is Southampton, UK a little later in the year so perhaps we’ll miss the snow. It is one of my favorite events of the year and I hope to see a lot of people there. OpenNMS is created in something of a bubble. Since we don’t require any form of registration to get the software we have no idea who is using it, and we are often pleasantly surprised to find out where OpenNMS ends up. I can’t wait to see who shows up in April.

Registration is not yet open, but they are interested in hearing from you. The users conference is about users by users and your stories are what’s in demand.

OpenNMS Gets An Emmy Nomination

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

Okay, so I’m stretching things a bit. Well, a whole lot. In fact, OpenNMS had nothing to do with the Emmy nod, and it is just a shameless attempt to get your attention.

I believe I have very little natural talent. The one exception is that I seem to be able to surround myself with some of the most amazing people on the planet. They do great things and I just bask in the reflected glory.

I’m not knocking it.

One of those people is our chief architect and CTO, Matt Brozowski. In his copious spare time he manages to do a lot of things, including coaching a program at the University of North Carolina called “Powering a Nation“. Each year students create a documentary involving some aspect of energy use in the United States, and the 2012 team created “100 Gallons: How Water Powers Life“.

It got nominated for a Emmy award.

How cool is that. It would be awesome if they won.

Matt is also coaching the 2013 team, so let’s see if they can go two for two.

Dev-Jam 2013: Day Five

Saturday, June 29th, 2013

The final day of Dev-Jam came all too soon. Several people headed out Friday morning, but we still had a nice crew of 20+ for a return trip to the Town Hall Brewery on Friday night.

I often joke that Dev-Jam is my favorite Holiday outside of Thanksgiving and Christmas, and it’s funny ’cause it’s true. I think the best way to sum it up is from Jeff Genender, Apache contributor and first time Dev-Jam attendee:

As an Apache stakeholder, I can honestly say you have a fantastic community and you guys exceed doing things “right”. Keep up the fantastic work and thank you sincerely for the fantastic hospitality and a great Dev Jam.

Until next year.